Archive for the Articles of Interest Category

In the Literature: Peanut Allergies

Recently, there was new research published in the New England Journal of Medicine about the development of peanut allergy in young children. The results suggest that young children at high risk of developing a peanut allergy may be able to decrease their chances of developing the allergy, […]

Read more

Flu Shot or Nasal Spray Vaccine?

As the flu season kicks off this fall, it is important for children who are 6 months or older to get vaccinated against the influenza virus. The flu vaccine comes in two forms: flu shot and nasal spray. For kids with a history of breathing problems or […]

Read more

The September Asthma Peak

Did you know that more asthma attacks occur in September than in any other month? A study published in the journal Pediatrics earlier this year found that asthma-related healthcare visits double during the month of September when compared with August. Many factors contribute to the “September asthma […]

Read more

Food Allergy vs. Food Intolerance

During follow-up interviews, we ask if your child has any doctor-diagnosed food allergies. We also ask if they have been diagnosed with lactose intolerance. Food allergy and food intolerance seem similar, but there are a few key differences. Food allergy: When a child has a food allergy, […]

Read more

Ear Infections & Respiratory Health

Why are ear infections often accompanied with breathing problem symptoms? Respiratory infections are the most common cause of ear infections. The middle ear (the inside part on the other side of eardrum) is normally well ventilated by air that passes from the nose through the Eustachian tube […]

Read more

Updated Well-Child Visit Schedule, Infancy –Adolescence

When do you bring your child to see a primary care provider for a healthy visit and which assessments are recommended at these visits? Last month, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a table of updated recommendations of preventive health care services that children should receive from […]

Read more

Allergy Sensitivity in the United States

When your child was enrolled in the WIND Study we took a blood sample to test for immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies, among other laboratory tests. The presence of an IgE antibody to a specific allergen (such as grass, milk, peanuts) means a child is sensitive to that […]

Read more

Updated Vaccine Schedules from Birth through Adolescence

Did you ever wonder about the different types of vaccines and when your child should receive them? The journal Pediatrics recently published an updated schedule of when children and adolescents should receive their immunizations. The schedule provides a timeline from 0 through 18 years of age and […]

Read more

In the Literature: Cold and Cough Duration in Children

How long do coughs and colds last in children? When should parents really worry about respiratory symptoms? Recently, the British Medical Journal published an article on the expected duration of common respiratory tract infection related-symptoms, such as earaches, sore throats, and croup. They reviewed the existing scientific […]

Read more

Food Allergy Regulations in Schools & Early Care Programs

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that food allergy affects 4-6% of all children in the United States. Allergic reactions from food are particularly dangerous for young children because they can unexpectedly have their first reaction at school or away from home. In October […]

Read more